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How to Fix Mac Finder Not Responding or Crashing: 18 Best Ways

The easiest way to fix Mac Finder not responding or crashing is to force quit the Finder app and then relaunch it.

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Last updated: September 24, 2023

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TL;DR

The easiest way to fix Mac Finder not responding or crashing is to force quit the Finder app and then relaunch it. This can be done by pressing Option⌥ + Command ⌘ + Esc to open the Force Quit Applications window, selecting Finder, and clicking “Relaunch.”

If this method doesn’t resolve the issue, other potential solutions include deleting corrupted Finder preference files, booting your Mac in Safe Mode, updating macOS to the latest version, and, as a last resort, performing a factory reset of your Mac.

Key Points:

  • Relaunching Finder using the Force Quit option is the quickest method to fix an unresponsive Finder.
  • Deleting Finder preferences can help, as corrupted preferences commonly cause Finder issues.
  • Booting your Mac in Safe Mode can help identify and resolve issues related to Finder not responding.
  • Updating macOS to the latest version ensures any bugs or glitches causing Finder problems are addressed.

Struggling with a Mac Finder that’s more frozen than a snowman in January? Finder is the beating heart of your Mac, the gateway to all your files and folders. When it goes AWOL or crashes, it feels like your digital world is crumbling.

This guide will walk you through game-changing solutions to get Finder—and your productivity—back on track. From quick fixes to deep dives, I’ve got the remedies to fix Mac Finder not responding and make your system behave. Let’s get started!

Before We Begin

Accumulated clutter in the form of junk files can bog down your Mac, leading to issues like an unresponsive Finder. One solution could be using the Safe Cleanup feature in MacKeeper, which scans and eliminates unnecessary files from your system.

Why Is Mac Finder Not Responding, Working Slow, or Crashing?

When Mac Finder isn’t working as expected—whether it’s not responding, operating slowly, or crashing entirely—the reasons could be manifold. Here are some common factors:

  1. 🛠️ Software Conflicts: Sometimes, third-party applications can conflict with Finder and cause it to malfunction.
  2. 💾 Corrupted Files: Damaged or corrupted files within your system can make Finder act erratically.
  3. 🍎 Outdated macOS: Running an outdated macOS version could lead to Finder issues.
  4. 🗂️ Too Many Files: Overloading your desktop with too many files can overwhelm Finder, leading to slow performance.
  5. 🗑️ Cache and Temporary Files: Accumulated cache and temporary files can clutter the system and affect Finder’s functionality.
  6. 💻 Hardware Issues: Though less common, problems like low RAM or hard disk errors could also be the culprits.
  7. 🐞 System Bugs: Sometimes, the issue might be a known bug requiring a software update.
  8. ⚙️ User Preferences: Occasionally, corrupted user preferences related to Finder can lead to issues.
  9. 🚀 Startup Items: Some applications set to launch at startup can interfere with Finder.
  10. 💽 Disk Space: Running low on disk space can severely hamper Finder’s ability to function properly.

How to Fix Mac Finder Not Responding, Working Slow, or Crashing

Most issues with Finder are not a lost cause and can be resolved without advanced technical skills. So, if you’ve been pulling your hair out and wondering why Finder is acting up, this guide covers a comprehensive range of solutions designed to get you back on track.

1. Force Quit the Finder App

One of the quickest methods to resolve a frozen or unresponsive Finder is forcing the application to quit and then relaunching it. This action can often clear minor glitches and get Finder back to its usual responsive self.

Here’s how to force-quit the Finder app on Mac:

  • Via Shortcut: Press Option⌥ + Command ⌘ + Esc to open the Force Quit Applications window. Select Finder and click Relaunch.
select finder and click relaunch
  • Via Apple Menu: Click the Apple logo in the upper-left corner of your screen. Choose Force Quit from the dropdown menu, select Finder, and click Relaunch.
click the apple icon and select force quit
  • Via Terminal: If you’re comfortable with Terminal, type in killall Finder and hit Enter. This will terminate Finder, and it should automatically relaunch.
type killall finder in terminal

Remember, forcing Finder to quit will close all Finder windows, so ensure you’ve saved any data you may be working on within those windows. Once you’ve successfully forced Finder to quit, it should restart automatically, hopefully free from whatever issue was plaguing it.

2. Restart Your Mac

Sometimes, the classic “turn it off and turn it back on again” approach can work wonders, and this holds true for resolving Finder issues as well. A simple restart can clear out minor glitches and free up system resources, providing Finder with a fresh environment.

Here’s how to restart your Mac:

  1. Click the Apple logo located in the upper-left corner of your screen.
  2. From the dropdown menu, choose Restart.
click the apple icon and select restart
  1. Click Restart on the pop-up window.
click restart to confirm your decision

Once your Mac restarts, check if Finder is functioning as expected.

3. Close Unneeded Programs

Running too many applications simultaneously can hog your system’s resources, leaving little for Finder to operate efficiently. Overloaded RAM or CPU can make Finder slow, unresponsive, or even cause it to crash. Closing programs you don’t currently need can free up these precious resources.

Here’s how to close apps on Mac:

  • Via Dock: Right-click or control-click the application’s icon in the Dock and select Quit.
right click the facetime app in dock and select quit
  • Via Application Menu: Open the application and click its name in the menu bar. From the dropdown, choose Quit [Application Name].
click safari and select quit safari
  • Via Force Quit Window: Press Option ⌥ + Command ⌘ + Esc to bring up the Force Quit Applications window. Select the application you want to close and click Force Quit.
force quit any processes that are causing problems
  • Via Activity Monitor: Open Activity Monitor from your Utilities folder. Locate the program consuming too many resources, select it, and click the X button in the top toolbar.
click x in the top bar to close a program

4. Unplug Connected Peripherals

unplug your macbooks charger

External devices like USB drives, printers, or secondary displays could sometimes conflict with Finder, leading to its poor performance or unexpected crashes. Disconnecting these peripherals can help isolate the issue and might just solve the problem.

Make a list of all peripherals connected to your Mac—this could include external hard drives, printers, USB hubs, etc. Carefully disconnect each peripheral device from your Mac. After all devices have been unplugged, restart Finder to see if the issue has been resolved.

One by one, reconnect the devices, checking Finder’s functionality after each one. This can help you identify if a specific peripheral is the culprit.

5. Delete Finder Preferences

Corrupt or outdated Finder preference files can result in various quirks, including non-responsiveness and crashes. Deleting these files can often reset Finder to its default behavior, resolving any issues you may be experiencing.

Here’s how to delete Finder preferences on Mac:

  1. Open a Finder window, click Go in the menu bar, and choose Go to Folder.
click go in the menu bar and select go to folder
  1. Type the following path:
~/Library/Preferences/
type library preferences directory in the box
  1. Look for files named com.apple.finder.plist and possibly com.apple.sidebarlists.plist.
find the com apple finder plist file
  1. Drag the files to the Bin or right-click and choose Move to Bin.
right click the finder plist file and select move to bin
  1. After the preference files have been deleted, restart Finder or your Mac to apply the changes.

Deleting Finder preference files will reset any custom settings you’ve made to Finder, so you may need to reconfigure those settings afterward.

6. Clear Your Storage

Running low on disk space can severely hamper Finder’s ability to function efficiently, causing slowdowns or even crashes. Freeing up storage can breathe new life into Finder and improve your overall system performance.

Here’s how to clear your storage on Mac:

a. Empty the Trash

Failing to empty the Trash can consume unnecessary storage space, potentially causing Finder to slow down or become unresponsive. To empty the Trash on Mac, follow these steps:

  1. Locate the Bin icon in the Dock and right-click it.
  2. Choose the Empty Bin option to delete items permanently.
right click the bin and select empty bin

b. Delete Unnecessary Files and Folders

Extra files and folders clutter your storage and may slow down Finder. Delete unneeded items by browsing your folders and identifying files you no longer need. Drag these files to the Bin or right-click and choose Move to Bin.

c. Clear Junk Files

Junk files can build up over time, affecting Finder’s performance. A dedicated cleaning tool, like MacKeeper, can help remove junk and temp files from your Mac. Here’s how to use MacKeeper’s Safe Cleanup to clear the junk files on your Mac:

  1. Download and install MacKeeper on your Mac.
  2. Launch MacKeeper and select Safe Cleanup in the left sidebar.
click safe cleanup under the cleaning section
  1. Click Start Scan.
click start scan in safe cleanup
  1. From the list of detected items, choose which ones you want to remove from your Mac or click Check All.
select junk files to remove or click check all
  1. Click Clean Junk Files.
tap clean junk files
  1. Wait for MacKeeper to finish cleaning. When it’s done, you’ll get a Cleaning Completed notification. Click Rescan to scan your Mac again.
click rescan in safe cleanup

d. Delete Duplicate Files

Duplicate files can consume significant disk space and cause Finder to lag. Here’s how to remove duplicate files from your Mac using MacKeeper:

  1. Download and install MacKeeper on your Mac.
  2. Open MacKeeper on your Mac and click Duplicates Finder in the left sidebar.
click duplicates finder in the left sidebar
  1. Click Start Scan.
click start scan in duplicates finder
  1. Select a folder in the left menu to review duplicate files before deletion.
click an item in the left sidebar
  1. Alternatively, you can click Check All and tap the Remove Selected button to remove all duplicate files at once.
click check all and tap remove selected
  1. Tap the Remove button on the pop-up to confirm the deletion.
click remove on the pop up window in duplicates finder
  1. This will remove the selected files, and you’ll get a Removal Completed message. Click Finish to end the process.
click finish to complete the process

e. Move Extra Files to External Storage

Clearing up disk space can often resolve issues you’re experiencing with Finder and improve your Mac’s overall performance. Once you’ve freed up some storage, restart Finder or your Mac to see if the problem is resolved.

7. Log Out and Log Back into Mac

Logging out of your Mac account and logging back in can be a soft reset for the system. This action will terminate all running applications and processes for the current user, potentially resolving any issues affecting Finder.

Here’s how to log out and log in to Mac:

  1. Make sure to save any unsaved work, as logging out will close all your open applications.
  2. Click the Apple logo in the upper-left corner of your screen and select Log Out.
click the apple icon and select log out
  1. A dialogue box will appear, asking you to confirm that you want to log out. Click Log Out to proceed.
click log out on the confirmation dialog
  1. After you’ve been logged out, you’ll be taken to the login screen. Enter your credentials to log back into your account.
  2. Once you’re back in, open Finder to see if it’s operating as expected.

8. Switch iCloud Off and On

iCloud integration is convenient for syncing files across devices, but sometimes it can act up and affect Finder’s functionality. Toggling iCloud off and then back on can often resolve synchronization glitches hindering Finder.

Here’s how to switch iCloud off and on:

  1. Before changing iCloud settings, ensure your important data is backed up to avoid any potential loss.
  2. Click the Apple logo in the upper-left corner, then select System Settings.
click the apple icon and select system settings
  1. Navigate to Apple ID > iCloud.
click icloud in apple id
  1. Click Sign Out at the bottom-left of the iCloud pane. Follow the prompts, choosing whether to keep a copy of iCloud data on your Mac.
click sign out
  1. Once you’ve successfully signed out, restart your Mac.
  2. After rebooting your Mac, go back to System Settings > Apple ID > iCloud and sign back in.
  3. Open Finder to see if the issue has been resolved.

9. Remove Your Login Items

Login items are applications, documents, or servers that automatically launch whenever you start up or log into your Mac. While convenient, some of these items could conflict with Finder and contribute to its unresponsiveness or crashes.

Here’s how you can remove your login items on Mac using MacKeeper:

  1. Download MacKeeper and install it on your Mac.
  2. Open Login Items under Performance in MacKeeper.
tap login items under performance
  1. Click Start Scan.
tap start scan
  1. Select unnecessary items from the list and click Remove Selected Items.
select the files you want to delete and tap remove selected items
  1. Tap the Remove button on the pop-up.
tap remove on the pop up
  1. It will remove your selected items from the system startup list. You can click Rescan to repeat the process.
tap rescan

10. Rebuild the Spotlight Index

Spotlight is the macOS search engine that indexes all your files and folders, enabling quick searches via Finder. However, a corrupted or outdated Spotlight index can cause Finder to act erratically, slow down, or even crash. Rebuilding the index can often resolve these issues.

Here’s how to rebuild the Spotlight index on Mac:

  1. Click the Apple icon in the menu bar and select System Settings.
click the apple icon and select system settings
  1. In the System Settings window, click Siri & Spotlight.
click siri and spotlight in system settings
  1. Scroll down the right pane and click the Spotlight Privacy button.
click the spotlight privacy button
  1. Click the + button at the bottom left of the Privacy window.
click the plus button in privacy window
  1. A new window will appear, showing your file system. Select your startup disk, usually named Macintosh HD, from the list, and click Choose.
select your drive and click choose
  1. Once you have added your startup disk to the Privacy list, Spotlight will stop indexing its contents.
  2. After adding the drive, wait a few minutes and remove it by selecting it and clicking the button. This will trigger Spotlight to rebuild its index.
  3. Rebuilding the Spotlight index may take some time, depending on the number of files you have. You can check the progress by using Spotlight; it will indicate that it’s reindexing.
  4. Once the reindexing is complete, try using Finder to see if the issue has been resolved.

11. Uncheck the Share Files and Folders Using SMB Option

The Server Message Block (SMB) protocol is commonly used for file sharing between Mac and Windows computers. However, this feature can sometimes interfere with Finder, causing it to hang, slow down, or crash. Disabling SMB sharing can help isolate or solve the issue.

Here’s how to uncheck the Share Files and Folders using SMB option on Mac:

  1. Click the Apple icon in the menu bar and select System Settings.
click the apple icon and select system settings
  1. Click General and navigate to Sharing.
click general and select sharing
  1. Locate the File Sharing option.
toggle on the file sharing option
  1. Click the small i button next to the File Sharing option.
click the small i next to file sharing
  1. In the window that appears, you’ll see a checkbox next to Share files and folders using SMB. Uncheck this box to disable SMB file sharing.
check share files and folders using smb
  1. Click the Done button to apply changes and close the window.
  2. Open Finder and test to see if the issue persists.

12. Uninstall Unnecessary Apps

Having too many applications on your Mac takes up valuable disk space and can result in conflicts that affect Finder’s performance. Uninstalling apps you no longer need can streamline your system and help Finder function more smoothly.

Here’s how to uninstall apps on your Mac:

  1. Click the Launchpad icon in the Dock, or use the Mac keyboard shortcut key: F4.
click the launchpad icon in the dock
  1. Scroll through the apps in Launchpad until you find the app you want to uninstall.
applications in launchpad
  1. Click and hold the app icon until it starts shaking and an X icon appears on the top-left corner of the app icon. Click the X icon to delete the app.
click the x icon to delete the app in launchpad
  1. Tap the Delete button on the confirmation dialog box, and it will move the app to the Bin in the Dock.
tap the delete button to confirm
  1. After deleting the app, right-click the Bin icon in the Dock and select Empty Bin.
right click the bin and select empty bin

Alternatively, you can use MacKeeper to uninstall unwanted apps on your Mac:

  1. Download and install MacKeeper on your Mac.
  2. After installation, launch MacKeeper and click the Smart Uninstaller in the left-hand menu.
click smart uninstaller in the left sidebar
  1. Click Start Scan.
click start scan in smart uninstaller
  1. Select the applications you want to delete from the list and click Remove Selected.
select the applications you want to remove and click remove selected
  1. Tap the Remove button on the pop-up to confirm the deletion.
click remove on the pop up window in smart uninstaller
  1. MacKeeper will uninstall the apps and remove associated files and folders. You will get a Removal Completed notification. If you want to scan your Mac again, click Rescan.
click rescan in smart uninstaller

What Else Can MacKeeper Do?

Besides clearing junk files, deleting duplicates, removing login items, and uninstalling apps, MacKeeper is a treasure trove of valuable optimization tools to clear cache, optimize your Mac’s storage, and keep ads in check. Learn more about its features in my detailed Mackeeper review.

13. Power Cycle Your Computer

Power cycling involves completely shutting down your computer, removing all power sources, and restarting it. This clears all temporary configurations and can solve various system glitches, potentially resolving issues with Finder.

Here’s how to power cycle your Mac:

  1. Make sure you save all your work and close any open applications to avoid data loss.
  2. Go to the Apple menu and choose Shut Down to turn off your Mac completely.
click the apple icon and select shut down
  1. If you’re using a Mac laptop, disconnect the charger. For desktops, unplug the power cord from the electrical outlet.
  2. Leave your Mac disconnected for about a minute to ensure all internal capacitors are fully discharged.
  3. Reconnect your power source and turn your Mac back on by pressing the power button.
  4. Open Finder to see if the issue has been resolved.

14. Boot Your Mac in Safe Mode

Booting your Mac in Safe Mode is a diagnostic mode designed to help you isolate issues related to your system and apps. In Safe Mode, macOS only loads essential software, effectively disabling most third-party applications and extensions. This can be particularly useful for identifying problems with Finder.

Here’s how to boot your Mac in Safe Mode:

Apple Silicon Macs

  1. Click the Apple icon and choose Shut Down from the drop-down menu.
click the apple icon and select shut down
  1. Wait for your Mac to shut down completely, and press the Power button to turn it on.
macbook air touch id
  1. Keep holding the Power button until you see the Loading startup options screen.
loading startup options screen on mac
  1. Select a volume from the options.
select a volume
  1. Press and hold the Shift ⇧ key and click Continue in Safe Mode.
macbook air shift key
  1. Your Mac will restart automatically, and you will see Safe Boot in the menu bar when the login screen appears.
safe boot mode on mac

Intel-Based Macs

  1. Restart or turn on your Mac and press and hold the Shift ⇧ key immediately.
macbook air shift key
  1. Keep holding the Shift ⇧ key until you see the login screen.
  2. Release the Shift ⇧ key and log in to your Mac.
  3. You may be asked to log in again.
  4. You’ll see Safe Boot in the menu bar on your first or second login window.
safe boot mode on mac

15. Repair Your Disk Using the Recovery Mode

Disk corruption can be a hidden cause of many problems, including Finder not responding, slowing down, or crashing. Repairing your disk using macOS Recovery Mode can fix file system errors that might affect Finder’s performance.

Here’s how to repair your disk permissions on Mac:

  1. Start or restart your Mac and immediately hold down the Command ⌘ + R keys until you see the Apple logo or a spinning globe. This will boot your Mac into Recovery Mode.
macbook air command r keys
  1. After the macOS Utilities window appears, select Disk Utility and click the Continue button.
select disk utility from macos recovery screen
  1. In the Disk Utility window, you will see a list of available disks and volumes on the left-hand side. Select the disk or volume you want to work with from the list.
disk container volumes in disk utility
  1. Select the disk and click the First Aid button in the toolbar.
select startup disk and click first aid
  1. Next, click Run to start the verification and repair process.
click run on the first aid prompt
  1. Wait for First Aid to complete, and click Done.
  2. After repairing all of the disks on your Mac, go to Apple > Restart and restart your Mac.
click the apple icon and select restart
  1. Once the process finishes, you’ll get a comprehensive report detailing what the First Aid process did. This report will provide information on any identified problems or issues.
  2. After you have performed the necessary operations in Disk Utility, you can quit Disk Utility and choose an option from the macOS Utilities window, such as reinstalling macOS, restoring from a Time Machine backup, or restarting your Mac normally.

16. Run Apple Diagnostics

Apple Diagnostics is a built-in tool that tests your Mac’s hardware components to identify issues that could be causing problems, including issues with Finder. While it’s more common for software conflicts to cause Finder issues, it also doesn’t hurt to rule out hardware faults.

Here’s how to run Apple Diagnostics on Mac:

On Apple Silicon Mac

  1. Disconnect all peripheral devices except the keyboard, mouse, Ethernet, display, and power cable.
  2. Shut down your Mac.
  3. Power on your Mac and hold the power button until the startup options screen with the Options icon appears.
startup options screen
  1. Press the Command ⌘ + D keys.
Press the Command D keys

On Intel-Based Mac

  1. Disconnect all external devices except the keyboard, mouse, Ethernet, display, and power cable.
  2. Shut down your Mac from the Apple menu.
click the apple icon and select shut down
  1. Press the power button and immediately press and hold the D key on your keyboard until a list of languages appears.
Press the power button and D
  1. Select a language, and Apple Diagnostics will start automatically.
select a language touse apple diagnostics
  1. Once the checking process is initiated, completing it usually takes 2-5 minutes.
  2. You’ll see a report listing any issues detected when the test completes. If you see an error message or reference code, note it and contact Apple Support or an authorized Apple service provider for further assistance.
report listing any issues detected
  1. To re-run the test, click Run the Test Again or press Command ⌘ + R.
press Command R
  1. If you don’t want to repeat the test, click Restart or Shut Down.
click Restart or Shut Down

17. Update Your macOS

Keeping your macOS up-to-date is crucial for system stability and performance. Software updates often include patches for bugs that could be causing Finder to act erratically. If you’ve been holding off on updating your system, now might be the time to do it.

Here’s how to update your macOS:

  1. As a precaution, back up important files and data before proceeding with the update.
  2. Go to the Apple menu and select System Settings.
click the apple icon and select system settings
  1. Click General and select Software Update.
click general and select software update
  1. If an update is available, you’ll see its details. 
  2. Click Update Now to initiate the update process.
click the update now button
  1. Follow the prompts to complete the update. Your Mac may restart one or more times during this process.
  2. After your Mac restarts and the update is installed, open Finder to see if the issue has been resolved.

18. Factory Reset Your Mac

A factory reset should be your last resort when all other troubleshooting steps fail. This process will erase all data and settings, restoring your Mac to its original condition. It’s an effective way to eliminate persistent software conflicts or corruption affecting Finder.

Here’s how to factory reset your Mac:

  1. Before taking this drastic step, ensure all your important files, settings, and applications are backed up.
  2. Log out from iCloud and iMessage to unlink your Mac from your Apple ID.
  3. Restart your Mac and immediately hold down Command ⌘ + R to enter Recovery Mode.
macbook air command r keys
  1. In the macOS Utilities window, select Disk Utility, then choose your startup disk and click Erase.
click your mac drive and tap erase
  1. Go back to the macOS Utilities window and select Reinstall macOS. Follow the on-screen instructions to install a fresh copy of the OS.
click reinstall macos in macos utilities
  1. After the installation, your Mac will restart. You’ll have to go through the initial setup process as if it were a new Mac.
  2. Once the setup is complete, restore your backed-up data and reinstall applications.
  3. Open Finder to see if the issue is finally resolved.

Get Your Mac Finder Back on Track

From simple steps like force-quitting Finder and restarting your Mac to more advanced measures like running Apple Diagnostics or even a factory reset, this guide provides robust tools for resolving almost any Finder-related issue.

Here are a few more tips to optimize your Mac and fix performance issues:

  • Mac running slow? Try closing unnecessary apps, deleting cache, and updating your apps and macOS.
  • If your Mac won’t shut down, there may be an issue with its software or third-party applications.
  • If your Mac often freezes and you have to see the dreaded beachball of doom, learn how to fix a frozen Mac.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. How do I fix Finder not responding on Mac?

    To fix Finder not responding on your Mac, start by force-quitting the Finder app. To do this, press Option⌥ + Command ⌘ + Esc to bring up the Force Quit window, then select Finder and click Relaunch. If this doesn’t resolve the issue, consider restarting your Mac or using Disk Utility to repair disk permissions.

  2. Is it OK to relaunch Finder?

    Yes, it’s generally safe to relaunch Finder if it’s not responding or if you’re encountering issues. Relaunching Finder will close and reopen the application, which often resolves minor glitches or freezes. You won’t lose any saved data in other running applications, but make sure to save any ongoing work in Finder windows before you relaunch it.

  3. Will deleting the .plist file affect Finder performance?

    Deleting the .plist file for Finder will reset its settings to default, which can resolve issues caused by corrupted or outdated configurations. Initially, you may notice that some of your customizations are lost, but this action often improves Finder performance if you were experiencing problems. Always back up the .plist file before deleting it, so you can restore it if needed.

Hashir Ibrahim

Author

I'm Hashir, a tech journalist with a decade of experience. My work has been featured in some of the top tech publications like MakeUseOf and MakeTechEasier. I have a bachelor's degree in IT, a master's in cybersecurity, and extensive knowledge of Apple hardware, specifically MacBooks. As the senior writer at MacBook Journal, I write in depth guides that help you solve any issues you have with your mac and unbiased reviews that help you make the right buying decisions.

Ojash

Reviewer

Hi there! I'm Ojash, a tech journalist with over a decade of experience in the industry. I've had the privilege of contributing to some of the world's largest tech publications, making my mark as a respected Mac expert. My passion lies in exploring, using, and writing about MacBooks, and I enjoy sharing my expertise to help others make informed decisions and get the most out of their MacBook experience. Join me as we delve into the fascinating world of MacBooks together!

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